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To best serve our patients and community, we continue monitoring the CDC guidelines and the Georgia Department of Public Health.
We are offering virtual office visits as well as in-office visits for well child checkups, vaccines and other needed services.

Covid-19 Announcement  Schedule Flu or Covid Vaccine
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Monkeypox

The risk of monkey pox to children is extremely low as <0.1% of all cases in the US occur in children. As we are getting numerous calls, we want to provide some general information about monkeypox.  Currently, we are NOT vaccinating children for monkeypox.

Monkeypox is a virus caused by a poxvirus, similar to but less severe than smallpox.  Before the 2022 outbreak, Monkeypox was seen primarily in some central and western African countries, although the first US case occurred in 2003. So far this year, there have been over 7,000 cases in the US with no fatalities.

Some facts about Monkeypox per the American Academy of Pediatrics:

    •    Symptoms: flulike symptoms (fever, chills, swollen lymph nodes, headache, fatigue) and rash (similar to chickenpox or hand foot mouth).  The rash begins 1-3 days after fever, first as pimples or blisters and then progressing to pustules and scabs. 

    •    Symptoms usually last 2-4 weeks.  A few cases can be severe.  

    •    The risk of kids getting infected with monkeypox is extremely low.  Currently, only 4 pediatric cases have been confirmed in the US.  

    •    Kids at increased risk for severe disease from Monkeypox include children under 8 years old, those with significant skin conditions (eczema, etc.), and immunocompromised

    •    Spread: Monkeypox is spread by close contact to skin lesions or bodily fluids of infected persons, contact with respiratory secretions, or contact with objects used by someone with Monkeypox.

    •    How contagious?  Monkeypox is contagious until the rash is fully healed (scabs gone and new skin formed). 

    •    Treatment available? Yes, especially if severe disease, risk for severe disease or complications, or lesions in certain areas (eyes, mouth, genitalia, anus).   Tecovirimat, an investigational drug, is the first-line treatment.

    •    Vaccine? Currently children are not being vaccinated unless they have a true exposure. The Jynneos vaccine is being utilized for adults older than 18 years old who are considered high risk or exposed.

If your child has a suspicious rash, has been in contact with someone with confirmed or suspected Monkeypox, or has traveled to an area of increased risk, please call Roswell Pediatric Center (770-751-0800).  

Another resource: https://www.healthychildren.org/english/health-issues/vaccine-preventable-diseases/pages/what-is-monkeypox.aspx?

 

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